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On Writing Well
On Writing Well
by William Zinsser



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The KeyThe Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth by Raymond Obstfeld; Franz Neumann
Myths, says James N. Frey, are the basis of all storytelling, and their structures and motifs are as powerful for contemporary writers as they were for Homer. In "The Key, novelist and fiction-writing coach Frey applies his popular "Damn Good" approach to Joseph Campbell's insights into the universal structure of myths, providing a practical guide for fiction writers and screenwriters who want to shape their ideas into a powerful mythic story.


Immediate FictionImmediate Fiction: A Complete Writing Course by Jerry Cleaver
From the creator of the famed Writer's Loft comes a writing course for those who want to see results now. With insightful tips on how to manage doubts, fears, blocks, and panic, "Immediate Fiction" will help readers develop their skill in as little as ten minutes a day.


The Complete Guide to Editing Your FictionThe Complete Guide to Editing Your Fiction by Michael Seidman
Using an easy-to-reference format, experienced editor Michael Seidman shows writers how to approach fiction editing from three angles: macro editing, style editing and market editing. Writers will learn to reread their manuscript paying close attention to the continuity of narrative elements, such as point of view, characterization, sequencing and dialogue. After revising and rearranging these elements, writers will edit stylistic aspects, scanning their work with foolproof techniques that ensure proper spelling, grammar and word choice. This guide also teaches how to edit work from a marketing perspective, so writers can keep the expectations of their readership firmly in mind as they title their manuscripts and write their submissions.


Writing in General and the Short Story in ParticularWriting in General and the Short Story in Particular by Rust Hills
Now a classic in the field, this practical guide to writing explains the essential techniques from character and plot to flashback and foreshadowing. A resource book for both beginning and seasoned writers.


The Art & Craft of the Short StoryThe Art & Craft of the Short Story by Rick DeMarinis
In his highly personal and compelling style, DeMarinis shares advice, classic examples and exercises in this definitive book on the short story.


Marriage of MindsMarriage of Minds: Collaborative Fiction Writing by Nikoo McGoldrick; James McGoldrick
Part how-to book, part relationship book, Marriage of Minds presents the strategies and techniques you need for creating successful collaborations and successful fiction.


The Art of FictionThe Art of Fiction: A Guide for Writers and Readers by Ayn Rand; Tore Boeckmann; Leonard Peikoff
In 1958, Ayn Rand, already the world-famous author of such bestselling books as Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, gave a private series of extemporaneous lectures in her own living room on the art of fiction. Tore Boeckmann and Leonard Peikoff for the first time now bring readers the edited transcript of these exciting personal statements. The Art of Fiction offers invaluable lessons, in which Rand analyzes the four essential elements of fiction: theme, plot, characterization, and style. She demonstrates her ideas by dissecting her best-known works, as well as those of other famous authors, such as Thomas Wolfe, Sinclair Lewis, and Victor Hugo. An historic accomplishment, this compendium will be a unique and fascinating resource for both writers and readers of fiction.


Making Shapely FictionMaking Shapely Fiction by Jerome Stern
A deft analysis and appreciation of fiction what makes it work and what can make it fail. Here is a book about the craft of writing fiction that is thoroughly useful from the first to the last page whether the reader is a beginner, a seasoned writer, or a teacher of writing. Jerome Stern maintains that learning to write spontaneously is the first step to writing well. You will see how a work takes form and shape once you grasp the principles of momentum, tension, and immediacy. "Tension," Stern says, "is the mother of fiction. When tension and immediacy combine, the story begins." Dialogue and action, beginnings and endings, the true meaning of "write what you know," and a memorable listing of don'ts for fiction writers are all covered.


Master ClassMaster Class: Scenes from a Fiction Workshop by Paul West
The acclaimed novelist and author of The Secret Life of Words re-creates his last writing seminar in which fifteen students reflect on the art of writing great fiction as they discuss one another's work and shares their insights into the creative writing process.


Narrative DesignNarrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft, and Form by Madison Smartt Bell
With clarity, verve, and the sure instincts of a good teacher, Madison Smartt Bell offers a roll-up-your-sleeves approach to writing in this much-needed book. Focusing on the big picture as well as the crucial details, Bell examines twelve stories by both established writers (including Peter Taylor, Mary Gaitskill, and Carolyn Chute) and his own former students. A story's use of time, plot, character, and other elements of fiction are analyzed, and readers are challenged to see each story's flaws and strengths. Careful endnotes bring attention to the ways in which various writers use language. Bell urges writers to develop the habit of thinking about form and finding the form that best suits their subject matter and style. His direct and practical advice allows writers to find their own voice and imagination.


Negotiating with the DeadNegotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing by Margaret Eleanor Atwood
Margaret Atwood, bestselling author of The Handmaid's Tale and The Blind Assassin, now turns a critical eye and examines the craft of writing. Looking back on her own childhood and writing career, Margaret Atwood examines the metaphors which writers of fiction and poetry have used to explain their activities, looking at what costumes they have assumed, what roles they have chosen to play. Atwood's wide reference to other writers, living and dead, is balanced by anecdotes from her own experiences, both in Canada and elsewhere. The lightness of her touch is offset by a seriousness about the purpose and the pleasures of writing, and by a deep familiarity with the myths and traditions of western literature. This memorable new book should be on every writer's bookshelf along with Stephen King's On Writing.


The KeyThe Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth by Raymond Obstfeld; Franz Neumann
Myths, says James N. Frey, are the basis of all storytelling, and their structures and motifs are as powerful for contemporary writers as they were for Homer. In "The Key, novelist and fiction-writing coach Frey applies his popular "Damn Good" approach to Joseph Campbell's insights into the universal structure of myths, providing a practical guide for fiction writers and screenwriters who want to shape their ideas into a powerful mythic story.


On WritingOn Writing by Eudora Welty
Covering techniques and tools every writer should know, this primer on the art of fiction is presented by one of the 20th-century's masters, Pulitzer Prize winner Eudora Welty.


Narrative DesignNarrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft, and Form by Madison Smartt Bell
With clarity, verve, and the sure instincts of a good teacher, Madison Smartt Bell offers a roll-up-your-sleeves approach to writing in this much-needed book. Focusing on the big picture as well as the crucial details, Bell examines twelve stories by both established writers (including Peter Taylor, Mary Gaitskill, and Carolyn Chute) and his own former students. A story's use of time, plot, character, and other elements of fiction are analyzed, and readers are challenged to see each story's flaws and strengths. Careful endnotes bring attention to the ways in which various writers use language. Bell urges writers to develop the habit of thinking about form and finding the form that best suits their subject matter and style. His direct and practical advice allows writers to find their own voice and imagination.


The Writer`s Digest Sourcebook for Building Believable CharactersThe Writer's Digest Sourcebook for Building Believable Characters by Marc Mucutcheon
Six novelists reveal their approaches to characterization in this guide, which comes with a questionnaire to help writers probe their characters' backgrounds, beliefs, and desires and a "thesaurus" of physical and psychological traits to aid in character development.


How Fiction WorksHow Fiction Works: The Last Word on Writing Fiction--From Basics to the Fine Points by Oakley M. Hall
A guide to writing short stories and novels includes writing exercises, examples, and advice on developing language, dialogue, point of view, and characterization.


Immediate FictionImmediate Fiction: A Complete Writing Course by Jerry Cleaver
From the creator of the famed Writer's Loft comes a writing course for those who want to see results now. With insightful tips on how to manage doubts, fears, blocks, and panic, "Immediate Fiction" will help readers develop their skill in as little as ten minutes a day.


The Stuff of FictionThe Stuff of Fiction: Advice on Craft by Douglas Bauer
The Stuff of Fiction is a collection of lively essays by esteemed novelist Douglas Bauer on the tools of the fiction writer's craft. Based on his popular lectures as a core faculty member in the Bennington Writing Seminars, individual chapters examine the components of successful stories, from creating the first sentence to crafting a fitting ending. Bauer's primary focus is on three critical elements of fiction writing: dialogue, character, and dramatic event. He sees dialogue as an overheard conversation that has an inherent intimacy and power that should not be squandered by the writer. He discusses the challenge of creating characters that are psychologically complex, both flawed and sympathetic. He cautions new writers against overloading their stories with highly dramatic events--or avoiding them altogether.


Novel & Short Story Writer`s MarketNovel & Short Story Writer's Market: 1,900+ Places to Get Your Fiction Into Print by Anne Bowling; Vanessa Lyman
Inside this handbook, fiction writers will find completely updated market entries for book publishers, magazines, literary agents, contests and script houses, plus brand new information on e-publishers, including interviews with industry experts, editors of e-magazines and more.


The Complete Idiot`s Guide to Getting Your Romance PublishedThe Complete Idiot's Guide to Getting Your Romance Published by Julie Beard
Takes the budding romance novelist through the entire process of developing story ideas, editing, finding publishers, and marketing.


The Spooky Art: Thoughts on Writing by Norman Mailer
Novel & Short Story Writer's Market 2003 by Anne Bowling (editor)
On Writing by Eudora Welty
Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing by Margaret Eleanor Atwood
Careers for Your Characters : A Writers Guide to 99 Professions from Architect to Zookeeper by Raymond Obstfeld, Franz Neumann
The Plot Thickens: 8 Ways to Bring Fiction to Life by Noah T. Lukeman
Immediate Fiction by Jerry Cleaver
The Complete Guide to Editing Your Fiction by Michael Seidman
45 Master Characters : Mythic Models for Creating Original Characters by Victoria Schmidt
Hooking the Reader: Opening Lines that Sell by Sharon Rendell-Smock
On Writing by Stephen King
Fiction Writer's Brainstormer by James V. Smith, Jr.
The Writer's Digest Sourcebook for Building Believable Characters by Marc Mucutcheon
Writer's Guide to Character Traits by Linda N. Edelstein
Description (Elements of Fiction Writing) by Monica Wood
Dialogue (Elements of Fiction Writing) by Lewis Turco
Plot (Elements of Fiction Writing) by Ansen Dibell
Setting (Elements of Fiction Writing) by Jack M. Bickham
Conflict, Action and Suspense (Elements of Fiction Writing) by William Noble
Building Better Plots by Robert Kernen
Creating Fiction by Julie Checkoway
The Writer's Tool Box: How to Write Fiction and Non-Fiction That Will Sell by Patrika Vaughn
Writing the Short Story by Jack M. Bickham
Writing Fiction Step by Step by Josip Novakovich
Steering the Craft: Exercises and Discussions on Story Writing for the Lone Navigator or the Mutinous Crew by Ursula K. Le Guin
Story Starters: How to Jump-Start Your Imagination, Get Your Creative Juices Flowing, and Start Writing Your Story or Novel by Lou Willett Stanek
Dynamic Characters by Nancy Kress
Six Walks in the Fictional Woods by Umberto Eco
Telling Lies For Fun & Profit by Lawrence Block, Introduction by Sue Grafton


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